Sunday, February 13, 2011

button (or other GPIO pin) debouncing

GPIO pin de-bouncing is a fairly common task and there are many good ways to implement it.  Here's how I handle it on most projects, I think that it's fairly clean and easy to adapt to small microcontrollers or for use in Linux kernel drivers.

Each pin that needs to be sampled and debounced can be represented with a state machine comprised of a state, value, and counter.  A pin is either idle (whether pressed or released) or in transition to being pressed or released.  To transition to the idle state, the pin must maintain the same level for a number of counts.

A pin can therefore be represented something like:

enum pin_state {
        PIN_IDLE       = 0,
        PIN_PRESSING   = 1,
        PIN_RELEASING  = 2,
};

struct pin {
        enum pin_state state;
        char pressed;
        unsigned char debounce;
        unsigned char debounce_threshold;
};

I use three states but with the combination of 'state' and 'pressed' and 'debounce' we really have four real states (idle-pressed, idle-released, pressing, and releasing).

At initialization time, the pin structure(s) should be set to zero.  The 'pin' structure should also contain information about the pin to enable a routine to check its value (for example the GPIO port and pin number).  We then poll the pin or pins in a thread or main loop.  For example, to check just one pin:

static struct pin;

void init(void)
{
        memset(&pin, 0, sizeof(pin));
        /* pick some reasonable threshold, this is a
           factor of your circuit and polling
           frequency */
        pin.debounce_threshold = 10;
}

void check_pins(void)
{
        /* invert this if the pin is active-low, as is common
           for buttons, we treat a '1' as 'active' */
        char cur = gpio_get_pin_value();

        switch (pin.state) {
              case PIN_IDLE:
                     if (cur != pin.pressed) {
                            pin.state = cur ?
                                    PIN_PRESSING : PIN_RELEASING;
                     }
                     break;
              case PIN_PRESSING:
                     if (cur) {
                            pin.debounce++;
                     } else {
                            pin.debounce = 0;
                            pin.state = PIN_IDLE;
                     }
                     break;
              case PIN_RELEASING:
                     if (cur) {
                            pin.debounce = 0;
                            pin.state = PIN_IDLE;
                     } else {
                            pin.debounce++;
                     }
                     break;
       }

       if (pin.state > PIN_IDLE &&
                      pin.debounce > pin.debounce_threshold) {
              /* report the pin press or release */
              report_pin(cur);
              /* and now the pin is idle */
              pin.state = PIN_IDLE;
              pin.debounce = 0;
              pin.pressed = cur;
       }
}

If there are multiple pins to check then I would replace the single 'struct pin' with an array and loop over them. In that case 'struct pin' should contain pin port and pin number information for your implementation of  'gpio_get_pin_value()'.
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